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October 17, 2018
Advocate Daily

 

No shark zone: defusing high-conflict family law cases

“When people are driven by their emotions rather than focusing on the needs of the family, their finances often take the hit.” Williams says.

“People use avenues to deal with their woes about separation that are not logical. They will spend hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal fees, and then say that their lawyer ripped them off. “Meanwhile, their lawyer is asking for their instructions to resolve the matter,” she says.


August 22, 2018
Advocate Daily

 

Child’s voice helpful in setting parenting schedules

“The interviewer would probably talk to the child about what things he or she does with each parent, and how they might feel at mom's or dad’s house,” she says.

“Ultimately, the goal is to find out what the child would like to see in terms of a parenting schedule.”


August 3, 2018
Advocate Daily

 

Resolution the focus for family lawyer Williams

“I tell them we can be friends when it’s all over — and there are past clients I celebrate birthdays with — but until then I’m there to give it to them straight, which, I believe, is what they pay a lawyer to do.”

“They’re not paying me to be their friend, and it’s always better to hear bad news from me now than to be yelled at by a judge later,” she adds.


July 2018
Advocate Daily

 

Best path forward: a practical approach to high conflict

"The task of coming to an agreement can also be complicated by the way lawyers behave with the parties, as well as with each other, both inside and outside the courtroom,” she writes. “Sometimes, the high conflict is not as a result of the opposing party, but the opposing party’s lawyer, which becomes a detriment to a successful, economical and efficient resolution of the case."

Williams offers the following practical tips to family law lawyers and those in other practice areas.






February 20, 2018
The Lawyers Daily